Tag Archives: television

PCP: Westworld

Watching Wednesday #23 – Wicked Ways

The Wild Wild West (We’re Going Straight to)

The short of it: Pro: excellent plot, storytelling, music, acting, choreography, setting. Con: No giant steampunk spiders

Fine, I’ll say it. Westworld kicks off harder than Game of Thrones.

To be fair, androids broaching sentience and a park for the darkest of human desires is easier to sell than medieval political intrigue. Both have plenty of radical murders though.

Westworld delivers this puzzle that leaves you grasping at straws rather than pieces, because it can’t be that obvious. And then it is. Then it isn’t.

My edge lord description of it is “It’s like if Jurassic Park had androids and didn’t suck.” The idea of a whole “world” dedicated to man’s recreation of life is fascinating; the fact it’s a world meant for amusement, not reflection or evolution, opens up a whole new level of questions.

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PCP: The Wire

Watching Wednesday #15 – Well, Wire Wins

Through The Wire

Wired for success

The short of it: Despite its obvious age, and the terrifying truth that the aughts are now a sign of age, The Wire’s vulnerable characters make this a sort of odd predecessor to Game of Thrones.

It’s the answer at everyone’s fingertips the moment social media asks about masterpieces of television or Twitter tosses out a poll about favorite shows.

And here I am, years and years later, just deciding to start it on a whim, despite the thousands of internet voices praising it every time I logged on.

No surprise here, it’s dope.

Now, I’d like to say that’s a bad joke on account of the dope-slinging focus in the first season, but the show’s heartbreaking depictions of both the addicts and the dealers make any joke about it far more bitter than I’d like. So for now, that’s just one of my more mediocre mannerisms.

The show’s good. It starts with this immediate jump into the life of the Baltimore Police Department– another victim of the streets to deal with and another soon-to-be-victim of the streets to comfort. Character names fly by, but the faces and voices stick.